Gary Neville regrets the ‘amazing’ living conditions for Qatar World Cup workers

Gary Neville slams Qatar for the first time for lamenting the ‘amazing’ living conditions of World Cup workers while touring a residence facility… as he slams ‘inequality as you won’t believe’

  • Gary Neville criticized the living conditions of workers at the World Cup in Qatar
  • He said workers live in “four-curtained cabins” in a new Sky documentary
  • The former Englishman admitted he was also concerned about workers’ wages
  • Neville had previously questioned about reports determining the situation in Qatar
  • Click here for the latest FIFA World Cup 2022 news and updates

Gary Neville shows palpable living quarters shock for World Cup workers as he parades around an official residence for a documentary to be shown Sunday night.

‘It’s a portable cabin with four blinds (blocking the sleeping areas) and two lockers on each side,’ says Neville. Wealth in this country and this level of residence of the people, with the sacrifices they make. It’s just inequality as you wouldn’t believe it. It’s really amazing. This is not a house.

Although Neville has appeared about the accommodation facilities the World Cup SC wants him to see, the Mail on Sunday has reported even more miserable places. In Al Sheehaniya in 2019, we found a smelly room in which ten Indian men were cramped, with cribs for cots.

Human rights organizations such as Amnesty International insist that the true picture of workers’ lives behind Qatar’s angry efforts to build 2022 cannot be found near stadiums “where visiting journalists go looking for evidence” but outside the city.

Neville expresses serious concern about the workers’ wages of $275 a month, which has been reduced to $55 a month after they send a large portion of it back to their families. “I find it inconvenient because when I buy a bowl of pasta and a beer or coffee, it’s a week’s wages,” he tells documentary filmmakers.

If this was my son, daughter and brother, I wouldn’t want them to be in this situation. Inequality is one of the biggest gaps you will ever see and there is no need for that because this is one of the richest countries in the world.

The housing official shrugs off his concerns, insisting that workers can work overtime if they wish, earning time and a quarter on weekdays and time and a quarter on weekends.

England fans heading to Qatar are preparing for a different home life experience this winter

England fans heading to Qatar are preparing for a different home life experience this winter

Gary Neville has been shown about accommodation facilities in a new documentary on Sky Sports

Gary Neville has been shown about accommodation facilities in a new documentary on Sky Sports

Lifeless metal buildings are advertised as portable cabins for the fans who will stay in Qatar

Lifeless metal buildings are advertised as portable cabins for the fans who will stay in Qatar

Al Thawadi admits to Neville that there would be discrimination if gay couples kissed in public during the tournament.

When Neville asked if this was a problem for Qatar, Al Thawadi replied: “It is important to first highlight whether the couple is gay or otherwise. Public displays of affection are not part of our culture.

After insisting on whether the couples will be asked to stop: Al-Dhawadi says: “Yes.”

Neville had previously downplayed human rights issues in Qatar, and questioned reports that workers were dying due to the conditions.

After backing Qatar’s controversial bid to host this year’s World Cup, he said in a previous documentary: “Do we think that in those sites, in front of Western project managers, workers are dying and they hide it?”

‘Are we really saying this is happening? I find it hard to believe because I have more confidence in people.

Neville visited Qatar on more than one occasion before the World Cup this winter

Neville visited Qatar on more than one occasion before the World Cup this winter

In the original documentary, Al Thawadi said that since 2020, only three workers have died of work-related causes, adding: “The death toll of 4,000 is inaccurate.”

Then, Mr. Neville said in an audio commentary: “There is a real struggle to know the real number. But… we can’t disprove the number three. And we certainly can’t prove the number 4,000.”

Last year, a Guardian analysis indicated that 6,500 migrant workers have died in Qatar since 2010, when it was chosen to host the tournament.

Construction is still underway with the tournament now just two months away

Construction is still underway with the tournament now just two months away

The former England defender twice rejected the opportunity to condemn Qatar’s treatment of women, gays and immigrants when asked by Mail on Sunday.

It now appears that he has changed his tune with the competition less than two months later.

Qatar Countdown, produced by Buzz 16, airs Sunday at 9:30pm on Sky Sports Premier League.

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